Watchtower Blood Map

The AJWRB.org “Watchtower Blood Map” displays the general geographic locations for cases where “Jehovah’s Witnesses” and the issues of “blood transfusions” (or “organ donations”) were reported or documented. Many original stories were reported by local media outlets. Others were sourced from individuals who may have been self-reporting or were sharing the story of a family member.

The RED MARKERS on the map represent people who survived their health crisis whether they accepted or rejected blood. Most of these were cases involved the courts taking temporary custody of a minor and then, by court order, allowed the doctors to use blood as a treatment to save the child’s life.

The BLACK MARKERS are all those who died – whether they got blood or not. Some who fall in this category did get a transfusion, but due to delays caused by having to process the cases through the courts, the death of a minor resulted even if blood was finally used.

Due to privacy issues cases not reported or published by media will only display initials. Available sources are cited in the details. All links were active at the time of posting, but please let us know if a supporting link is no longer functioning. We have backup resources for most cases that we can substitute to provide a working link.


The Map’s goal is to combat the false notion promoted by the leaders of the Watchtower organization that “most Witnesses survive their health crisis without the use of blood.” This map, even though it only provides a snapshot of known and reported cases, shows a very contradictory and disturbing picture.

The map is by no means a complete representation of every patient or medical emergency when the use of blood was an issue. No matter how newsworthy the circumstances might be, many cases are never reported to or by the media. Nor are medical situations when people do not take blood – and yet they manage to survive. For purposes of our map, we will only record the information that we found reported by the public media or by other reliable and verifiable sources.

By far, most deaths occur to young adults whose lives were cut short because they were confused or not fully informed about the blood policy. Just to be sure that they would not “break any rules,” many chose to refuse all parts of blood – even when the use of a permitted blood “fraction” might have saved their lives.

9 Comments

  1. alexus daring

    I truly appreciate all the hard work that went into mapping this out! Thank you very much!

    Reply
  2. rosemary osborn

    how soon will that cult get exposed to the world for all the harm they have done to the brain-washed robots? Please please let it happen sooner than later. Criminal!

    Reply
  3. Jennifer

    This is a great map! I think that someone who has access to the records at the Society could round out the map, much like the cases of child abuse that were exposed. One can only take a guess at what percentage of blood transfusion cases make it to the media. Also, sometimes the media doesn’t always report correctly. Even so, this map shows that its very risky to refuse a blood transfusion when needed. Additionally, the only fraction of blood now prohibited is the red blood cells that carry oxygen. Makes no sense at all. I feel that the conscience of the doctor to save a life supercedes that of the patient – but unfortunately that is not the law.

    Reply
  4. Joy Grant

    Dean C. Becker (elder, on building committee, substitute C.O.) Died 1/2002 (age 76) refused Blood transfusion-disecting aorta that blew while waiting to build blood up post perforated prostate preparing for surgery. Fairhope Alabama

    Dwight D. Imhof (elder) Died 9/2002 (age 82) refused blood transfusion-bled to death from bleeding hemorrhoid. Delavan Wisconsin

    Reply
  5. Diane Mitchell

    Thank you so very much got all the information you have provided on your site.

    Reply
  6. Active JW

    Hi Lee Elder,

    I’m a current JW. I’m thankful to Jehovah for learning his great name and achieving salvation and his undeserved kindness through his son Jesus Christ. Becoming one of Jehovahs people has been such a blessing to me. Unlike what many opposers will say, JWs are good people with sincere intentions and we do think for ourselves and have our free will. I, however, have always been trouble by the GBs position on blood transfusions among other things I suspect are man-made and not divine. I am in the medical field so the reasoning behind a lot of what is stated here makes plenty sense. The GBs flip-flopping positions on what is allowed or not is very troubling to me and I pray to Jehovah every night that I am making the right decision. I hold these views privately but I wanna thank you for all the information you give regarding such a sensitive issue.

    Reply
  7. when he comes cults will pay

    It would be good to make a map about all the Suicides due to Pressure/Abuse/Mistreatment of JW Cult. This Cult brakes up Families and follows Dogma for which they sacrifice even their Kids. They do NOT follow Christ alone, they are brainwashed by 7 Men in Brooklyn who claim to have the Holy Spirit.

    Reply
  8. Stochastics?

    The map doesn’t and cannot factor in all relevant data.

    It would be better to only depict the reported cases in which someone died or suffered avoidable damage to health and let people interpret the numbers for themselves. You cannot put data into context without knowing that context, i.e. all instances of relevant medical procedures. The inclusion of some cases where people survived creates a false impression of a quota not based on correct statistics, which is further complicated by the survival cases including such in which the patient did get a transfusion.

    While the description above explains what the map does and does not depict, I think most people who see the map may interpret it at least subconsciously as “no blood: death vs. survival”. If you don’t have all the data, the representation as is doesn’t make much sense.

    Imagine having a box with black and red balls, then you let people each draw one, but let them decide whether to report to you which color they drew. There’s just no way you could tell from their reporting what the ratio of black and red balls in the box is.

    You could argue that with a high enough number it was likely the ratio in the reports would be at least similar enough to the true ratio in the box if whether people report back or not was equally likely for both colors, but that’s not the case here and the overall number of cases the map shows is way too low for that argumentation to begin with.

    Also should be noted that according to medical staff, a vast percentage of witnesses actually do agree to blood transfusions when their lives depend on it or they at least think it does. Which was personally confirmed to me by an elder of the HLC, though the most common approach was said to be keeping the transfusion secret from anyone else. That makes including surviving patients even more questionable, since it’s literally false data.

    I apologize for the long text, so here’s the tl;dr: better not use incomplete statistics.

    To be clear, I am not insinuating the creator of the map was trying to deceive anyone as the description explains what the presented data means and you can click on each mark to see what case it refers to. I just don’t think the presented data is representable enough for a comparing depiction. If you still want to include the surviving patients, I suggest to at least have four colors instead of two:

    blood yes, survival yes
    blood yes, survival no
    blood no, survival yes
    blood no, survival no

    As I understood it, the goal of this map was to give an impression on how denial of transfusions affects the outcome of medical procedures and that’s why I think there should be a clearer distinction between those cases.

    Reply

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